TSA prepares for busy holiday travel at OIA

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ORLANDO, Fla. - Orlando International Airport officials said they expect the airport to be very busy during the Thanksgiving holiday.

Thanksgiving is one of the busiest travel times of the year, and Transportation Security Administration officials said it's their goal to get everyone through the checkpoint in 20 minutes or less.

More than 100,000 people are expected this weekend, but Nov. 30 will be the busiest travel day, officials said.

Travelers can bring holiday pies through the checkpoint, but it slows things down.

TSA said that travelers need to make sure they know the rules when it comes to firearms.

"We ask that they make sure they check where their weapon is before they come to the airport. If they come through, they will be arrested," said an airport official.

Another travel tip is that all airlines will allow pets on the plane, but not in cargo. The animal needs to be able to stand up and to move around.

Craig Ogden is an explosives specialist at Orlando International Airport. He served 14 years in the Army but now works for Homeland Security and trains TSA agents to identify possible security threats.

"So we always want them thinking about if I pick this up and it's not quite right the balance isn't quite right, then maybe something's not quite right," Ogden said.

TSA agents are tested every day. Ogden said there is an entire table of items they built and try to get past the checkpoints. The TSA agents' job to see the items may look harmless but carry simulated explosive devices.

"Looks can be deceiving. If you see this you (say) 'Oh a baby doll, oh how cute,' but if you feel her head it's a little bit heavier, if you pull down her hat you can see an indicator light and she's holding something in her hand that could trigger an explosive," Ogden said.

Ogden said TSA officials constantly must stay ahead of the curve.

"We're constantly building things again based on the best available intel and also based on what we see as potential threats," Ogden said.