New documents shed light in baby's death case



SANFORD, Fla. - WFTV obtained newly released documents in the case against Sanford mother, Rachel Fryer.

Fryer is charged with child neglect in connection to 2-year-old Taraji Gordon's death, but the documents reflect a now-reopened case of the death of her other child, Taraji's twin brother, Tavontae, in 2011.

Officers said Fryer was charged with child neglect in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, who had trouble breathing before she died.

Fryer never called for help, investigators said.

Sanford police said that in 2011, Fryer had cocaine in her system when she rolled over her 2-month-old Tavontae and killed him.

Tavontae's autopsy report ruled his death an accident.

The documents show Tavontae was supposed to be hooked up to an apnea machine to monitor his breathing, because he had a heart condition.

However, according to the documents, the machine was in the garage, and it had only been used three days during the boy's life.

Records from the machine show Tavontae had nine episodes of apnea and 25 episodes of a low heart rate.

The documents show the Child Protective Services investigators wanted a negligence charge, but the State Attorney’s Office was not interested because of the medical examiner’s report.

Channel 9’s Tim Barber talked to Fryer’s cousin, Kyle Lythle, who said he fully believes the deaths were accidental.

"It was a mistake. I don’t believe it was anything intentional--no biased opinion because that is my aunt or whatever," Lythle said.

He also said people should not jump to conclusions.

"Their opinion doesn’t matter because they were not there for the situation. They were not concerned when neither one of my cousins were living, so I don’t care what they have to say," Lythle said.

WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer said the autopsy ruling put an end to potential child neglect charges.

Fryer is still in jail on a $95,000 bond for the child neglect charges concerning Taraji.

Before any of Fryer’s children died, she already had them taken away when investigators said they found the children in a drug house during a raid.