Channel 9 learns red-light cameras differ per community on right turn on red tickets

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ORLANDO, Fla. - After Channel 9 reported earlier this month that nearly all the red-light camera tickets in Clermont were issued to drivers who turned right on a red light, we've received dozens of calls and emails.

Channel 9's Racquel Asa checked the policies for red-light camera tickets in every jurisdiction in central Florida and found the rules are different depending where you drive.

Merrill Meeks got a ticket when she turned right on a red at the intersection of 17/92 and Horatio  Avenue in Maitland.

"This happened almost a year ago now," he said.

Meeks said the light with turn arrows makes it even more confusing.

"We don't know what to do," he said. "And I think a lot of people are confused by what the sign says and what the arrows are telling us."

Channel 9 found if the same scenario played out in city of Orlando," Meeks would never have received a ticket, because Orlando's cameras don't issue red-light tickets on a right hand turns.

"It's each of these jurisdictions making up their own policies, their own rules and there is nothing fair about that at all," said Meeks.

Just like Maitland, all the cameras in Winter Park, Apopka and Ocoee will issue a ticket to drivers who turn on red lights and don't come to a complete stop before going into the intersection.

However, both Orange County and Kissimmee only have one camera that catches drivers not stopping before turning, and there's a warning to drivers at those intersections.

Asa found that in some cities a car has to trigger the camera system first, and it'll only snap a picture if the vehicle is going more than 13 mph when it travels over the stop bar.

Meks said he's stopped taking his chances in Maitland altogether.

"I will take my business somewhere else rather than have to come through this area," he said.

Florida law requires drivers to come to a complete stop before making a right-hand turn, regardless of whether there is a red-light camera.

But if you're caught by an officer, you'll pay an even bigger fine of $262.