DNA, blood found in Luis Toledo's car, house after wife, stepchildren presumed dead

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DELTONA, Fla. —

Channel 9's Blaine Tolison and Tim Barber are going over hours of discovery that was released Wednesday in the case of a man accused of killing his wife and two stepchildren in Deltona last year.

Investigators released nearly 500 pages of evidence that could shed light on what happened to Yessinia Suarez and her children, 9-year-old Thalia Otto and 8-year-old Michael Otto.

All three are presumed to be dead, though their bodies have never been found.

Luis Toledo was arrested in October and has confessed to killing Suarez but maintains an accomplice killed the children.

Out of the hundreds of new documents released, a Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime lab report lists 60 pieces of DNA evidence, much of it coming from the Deltona home where Toledo said he killed his wife by striking her one time in the throat.

DNA evidence also came from Suarez's Honda, which a Seminole County school bus driver said she saw Toledo cleaning in a Lake Mary Publix parking lot.

"He kind of scared me because I was like, why he's doing it, like, why he's cleaning?" the bus driver said. "And I thought he worked in Publix."

Channel 9 also learned blood found in the home belonged to Thalia. Her blood was also found on the trunk liner of the Honda, which investigators said a neighbor helped Toledo drop off in Lake Mary where the bus driver spotted it.

"He was cleaning the front windshield real fast and he would just clean real fast and he got out and he went to the front of the car and he started cleaning," said Williams.

Deputies recovered the trunk liner in a dumpster in the area.

The new reports show that no blood evidence was found from Suarez or Michael.

WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer believes Thanlia's blood will connect the dots for a jury if Toledo goes to trial.

Channel 9's Tim Barber found an interview with Toledo's ex-wife, Evelyn Ramos, who told authorities Toledo changed his ways after marrying Suarez.

Ramos said Toledo hung out with a bad crowd in Miami but said he settled down after meeting Suarez. She said he went from being a rough neck to a stay-at-home dad with the dream of becoming a barber.

"He's always at home. He's actually changed a lot compared to the Luis he used to be years ago when I was with him," said Ramos. "He's not the same Luis anymore. He's actually settled down a lot."

Ramos went on to describe Toledo's new life with Suarez.

"He cooks for her. He cleans, you know," said Ramos. "He laid the tile in the house. He does the yard work. He takes care of her kids, you know, so, I mean, he's changed a lot."

Ramos told authorities she didn't know much about Suarez and said she wasn’t jealous of her, rather she just did not care for Suarez.

"She's just one of those girls that likes to act like they're high class and mighty and that's just, you know, so we don't have that kind of relationship," said Ramos.

Ramos gave plenty of opinions about Suarez in the interview, but she didn't have anything to say about the disappearance of Suarez or the children.

"She's a jealous person and she's just, nobody likes her, nobody," said Ramos. "His family don't like her, his friends don't like her. Nobody likes her."

She went on to say Toledo was not the best dad, but that he was never violent.

The alleged slayings of Suarez and her children came just hours after Toledo was heard in a 911 call accusing his wife of cheating.
 
Suarez's family has spoken out several times about the torment they said they have gone through after losing three loved ones and then waiting to see if Toledo would be charged in their deaths.
 
A grand jury has indicted Toledo, who is now facing three murder charges.