Heated battle expected for Orlando City Council seat

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ORLANDO, Fla. - The race for Orlando's District Five City Council seat is heated and now down to two candidates. One is an attorney who is the son of the current commissioner and the other a nurse who's been arrested 21 times.
 

In Tuesday's election none of the three candidates won a majority so the race is headed to a runoff between Juan Lynum and Regina Hill. 
 
On Wednesday Channel 9's Kenneth Craig sat down with both candidates who talked about their plans to gain the upper hand in the close race.  
 
The difference between Lynum and Hill came down to just 37 votes. 
 
It appears clear that the community is split on who they want representing them in City Hall.
 
Lynum and Hill are two candidates who come from different backgrounds, but each claims to be the one who can turn a struggling district into something better
                       
Juan Lynum's mother Daisy Lynum has held the seat on the City Council for 16 years.
 
"I will be accountable, I will be accessible, I will be a fighter, I will be an advocate," Juan Lynum said.
           
Lynum is a businessman, attorney and has served on city and county boards.
 
Hill is a nurse who told Craig that she knows the struggles of District 5 better than anyone else.
 
"I also know how to overcome those same issues; welfare, food stamps, crime, a past," said Hill.
 
But many, including political analyst Rick Foglesong expected Lynum to easily take the reins from his mother. They didn't expect that he would be in a heated race with a political newcomer who has a troubled past.
           
"There is a new storyline, I think -- a political heir trading on his mother's name running against a woman who's recast herself," said Foglesong.
 
Hill has been arrested 21 times, many of them on drug charges.
 
She said she's turned her life around and can identify with the district's residents.
 
"This story is about hope, about a new day in District 5," said Hill.
 
Juan Lynum has campaigned on his mother's legacy. He said he now has a new strategy to win the race, and it does not involve his mother.
 
"The only thing I can promise is that there is going to be a big, big difference," he said.