Man found guilty in shooting of girl in Pine Hills wants new trial

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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. —

The man convicted for trying to kill Danielle Sampson is demanding a new trial.

Tyrone Mosby now says a man who testified against him was the one who fired the shot that left Sampson permanently disabled.

Mosby is set to be sentenced in just two weeks and he faces up to life in prison.

After his conviction, his mother insisted he was innocent and promised they would fight.

Mosby is blaming the judge the jury because the defense wasn't allowed to come out and blame the key witness in the case, Chester Joseph, who also was shot at in the incident.
 
Channel 9's Kathi Belich spoke with two jurors from Mosby's trial about what they believe happened here last year. Both said they stand by their guilty verdict.

Danielle Sampson couldn't testify at the trial because she can't talk. She can't do anything for herself after being hit in the head by a stray bullet. She was hit while riding in a car with her family in Pine Hills.

Her parents, who care for her at home, did not see who fired the bullet either.

Joseph told the jury he did see who it was and said it was Mosby.

He admitted that at first he first lied to investigators and claimed he did not know who the shooter was.

The defense tried to convince the jury through implication, that Joseph was also armed and that he could have fired the shot that severely injured Sampson.

One of the jurors who convicted Mosby told Belich that there was no evidence of that.

"It did not seem likely. There were a number of corroborated stories that when they came together to, to show that he didn't have any sort of weapon on him," said the juror.

Another juror told Belich that the jury wrestled with Joseph's credibility, but said his testimony was corroborated by other evidence in the case.

"We listened to a number of testimonies multiple times and so I don't think there was ever really a question in our minds whether or not Chester Joseph had a, had a weapon," said the juror.

Mosby's motion for a new trial criticizes the jury for convicting him on the evidence the state presented.

One of the jurors said he's not at all fazed by that; he stands by the verdict.

He said the jurors were very thorough in their deliberations.

Natalie Jackson, attorney for Sampson's family, told Belich that they have full faith and confidence in the prosecutors in the case.