Victims identified in deadly plane crash in Flagler County



PALM COAST, Fla. - NTSB investigators released the identities of the victims who were killed when a plane crashed into a Palm Coast home Friday afternoon.

Saturday afternoon, officials identified the three victims as 57-year-old Michael Anders, of Albany, KY, 59-year-old Duane Shaw, of Albany, KY and 42-year-old Charissee Peoples, of Indianapolis.

Anders, who was the pilot, was a high school teacher in Clinton County, KY. He taught Spanish at Clinton County High School, school officials said.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators have been out at the home since Saturday morning. Officials said they will look into several factors in hopes of determining what exactly caused the deadly crash.

"For the machine, we're going to look at aircraft records, maintenance, if there was any that was recently done. For the environment, weather conditions," said NTSB investigator Terry Duprie.

Officials said the three victims died when the small plane they were in crashed into the Palm Coast home. A woman in the home was able to escape without serious injury, officials said.

According to investigators, Anders declared an emergency at 2:10 p.m. Friday and reported the plane was shaking severely.

The Beech Bonanza (BE35) aircraft was en route to Downtown Island Airport in Knoxville, Tenn., when Anders reported the mechanical problem, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

The aircraft was diverting to Flagler County Airport when it crashed into a house on Utica Path about 2:22 p.m.

“It felt like a rumble in the ground when it hit,” said neighbor Jeff Seely.  “After, it was fully engulfed in flames."

"The challenges are, as always, what happened?" said Trooper Justin Asbury of the Florida Highway Patrol. "And that's going to be our goal, to find out what exactly happened."

Susan Crockett was the only one in the house at the time of the crash. She was in her bedroom when the plane hit and  escaped by climbing through a window.

“They took the mom to the hospital. She was pretty shaken up,” said Seely.

Crockett's 20-year-old daughter said her mother's survival was nothing short of a miracle.

"It's nothing but God, the fact that my mom survived, the fact that she was able to get out," said Jessica Crockett.

She said that because of their proximity to the Flagler airport, her mother knew immediately that it was a plane that struck the house.

"The planes get really loud because they fly really low, but you never thought it would actually happen," said Crockett.

Her mother was treated and released from Florida Hospital Flagler.

According to air traffic control transmissions obtained by WFTV, mechanical problems and weather may have played a factor in this crash.

"Daytona this is three five seven bravo, we've got a vibration in the prop. I need some help here," the pilot tells air traffic controllers in a radio transmission.

"Are you IFR capable and equipped?" the controller asks.

"Yeah, I'm IFR. We're getting a little vibration, we've got oil pressure problems, we're going to have to drop quickly here," the pilot said.

"November, three, five, seven bravo is clear to Flagler via radar vectors. Descend and maintain 2,000 on your present heading," the controller said.

The Flagler County airport is only a few miles from the crash site in the Seminole Woods subdivision.

"Three five seven bravo, how many people are on board and how much fuel you got?" the controller asked.

"Three souls on board and we've got plenty of fuel," said the pilot.

According to radio traffic, the pilot had limited visibility and as air traffic controllers tried to guide the plane they lost contact.

"Three, seven, five, bravo heading three, two, zero, two miles from runway (pause) five bravo you still with me? (pause) Three, seven, five bravo, Daytona?" a controller said.

Then, other pilots were told about an emergency in progress.

"Expect further clearance in 10 minutes. We have an emergency going on in Flagler. I'll get back to you just as quick as I can," the controller said.

NTSB investigators continued to comb through the wreckage on Saturday.