Police: George Zimmerman's back was covered in grass

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SANFORD, Fla. —

The first police officer on the scene after George Zimmerman's fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin has testified that Zimmerman's backside was covered in grass and was wetter than his front side.

That bolsters the contention of Zimmerman's defense lawyer that it was Martin who was on top of Zimmerman when they scuffled before the shooting.

Police officers first got a call of a suspicious person, a call that Zimmerman made, shortly after 7 p.m. that February 2012 night.

By the time officers arrived, Martin was facedown in the grass and Zimmerman was standing on the sidewalk.

Officers Tim Smith and Ricardo Ayala first arrived and tried to revive Martin, but it was too late.

Smith then spoke with Zimmerman, who told him he shot Martin and then showed the gun was in his holster.

"Were you wearing gloves when you first made contact with the defendant and removed his holster and firearm?" prosecutor John Guy asked Smith.

"I was not," said Smith.

"Did you handle the firearm in a special way when you removed it?" asked Guy.

"No, sir," said Smith.

"Why not?" asked Guy.

"There wasn't enough time," said Smith.

Zimmerman has said in the past Martin tried to grab his gun, but Martin's fingerprints were never found on the murder weapon.

But on Tuesday, a crime scene investigator testified it's possible fingerprints can be wiped off if the item isn't properly handled.

A neighbor who witnessed that scuffle also testified Friday that he believed Martin was on top of Zimmerman.

The first paramedic on the scene testified that Zimmerman had a swollen and bleeding nose, and two cuts on the back of his head that were an inch long.

Zimmerman has claimed that he fatally shot the unarmed 17-year-old in self-defense as the teen was banging his head into a concrete sidewalk.

But under prosecution questioning, neighbor Jonathan Good testified Friday that he never saw anyone being attacked that way during the fight that led up to the shooting.