Proposed Fla. law would put breathalyzers in some DUI offenders' cars

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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. —

An Orlando woman just got her fourth arrest for drunk driving after police said they found her so drunk she couldn't even keep her eyes open. They said she passed out in the driver's seat.

A bill currently up for discussion in the Florida Senate could keep repeat offenders from ever being able to put their cars into drive if they're drunk.

Orlando police charged Odette Alvarado, 41, with her fourth DUI.

Police said an observant bartender at Clicks called police after seeing Alvarado, who they said could barely stand, fall asleep with the car doors open in the parking lot.

Alvarado has had numerous traffic citations related to alcohol, from driving under the influence to driving while her license was revoked.

"I didn't realize there weren't more severe restrictions on them at that point in time. I thought they would probably take their license away for good," said Orlando driver Karley Crenshaw.

Even without a license, without physically being there, police can't stop Alvarado, or other DUI offenders from putting the key in the ignition.

A new bill in the Senate could stop repeat offenders in their tracks.

Senate Bill 796, introduced by Port Orange Sen. Dorothy Hukill, would allow judges to order breathalyzers be put in the car of someone who gets a DUI.

The driver would have to breath into the device to start the car.

Some think the bill oversteps government's boundaries.

"The infringement would be on people's right to privacy in their own vehicle," said Orlando driver Bill Gleeson.

Other Orlando drivers like the idea, but think it should only be used for repeat offenders, like Alvarado.

"You kind of lose some of your freedom after that because someone's life could be in jeopardy at that point," said Matt Botu of Orlando.