Salon shooting victim filed for injunction weeks ago

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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. - Police said a man shot and killed three women at a beauty salon in Casselberry before driving to a separate location and turning the gun on himself.

Thursday’s shooting happened after the woman who police believe was the intended victim, Marcia Santiago, asked for an injunction against the shooter, Braford Baumet, police said.

 It’s a pattern that has led many to believe injunctions lead to more violence, according to Channel 9’s Jorge Estevez.

Santiago filed for a restraining order against Baumet 13 days ago. She had a hearing scheduled for 1 p.m. today, but she was shot and injured before that happened.

Three other women were killed by Baumet.

In a different case last month, Carlene Pierre filed an injunction where she clearly feared for her life, Estevez said.

“He told me the only way he is going to leave me alone is by killing me,” she said.

Police said Michilet Polynice killed Pierre one day after he was served with the injunction. 

Police said Polynice killed Pierre at a Quality Inn & Suites off International Drive, shot a co-worker and killed one of her friends at another location. He then killed himself in a fiery crash, authorities said.

In August, Jorgete Acarie, filed an injunction against Kristopher Gould, accusing him of threatening to kill her and her children.

Acarie was found shot to death.

In September 2011, Jesus Morales was accused of killing his ex-girlfriend, Heidi Shelmire, at the DeBary Burger King where she worked. The 38-year-old single mother had also filed an injunction, said Estevez.

Harbor House, a refuge for women and children, is still adamant, however, about filing injunctions. But it admits some abusers become unpredictable.

Experts said in addition to filing injunctions, abuse survivors need to have a safety plan in place and alert family, friends and co-workers of the situation so everyone can be on the lookout to avoid deaths like the ones that happened Thursday.

Harbor House said injunctions work most of the time, pointing out that the organization has helped women with about 4,000 injunctions in Orange County last year.