Winnie Palmer Hospital to stop inducing non-emergency births

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ORLANDO, Fla. - Mothers who want to deliver at Winnie Palmer hospital won't be able to pick the day their baby is born.

The hospital is no longer letting doctors induce patients or perform early C-sections unless it's medically necessary.

The hospital said too many babies were winding up in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit that did not need to be there if their moms and doctors had simply waited.

Some mothers are choosing to have their babies born at 39 weeks and asking their doctor to perform a C-section or induce labor.

Lorraine Parker with Winnie Palmer Hospital said some mothers are exhausted from the Florida heat.

"A lot of women are tired of being pregnant, they've gotten to 37 weeks, they've had other children delivered at 37 weeks that did fine," said Lorraine Parker with Winnie Palmer Hospital.

Others want to schedule it so out-of-town grandparents can arrive at the perfect time, or a parent in the military wants to see his child before being deployed.

Winnie Palmer hospital said those reasons are not important enough to risk the health of a child with an early delivery.

"This is about putting the baby first," Parker said.

One little girl was just born Wednesday, and doctors said even her final day in the womb was critical for her lung and brain development.

"We want to be leaders in establishing these protocols," said Dr. Jose Gutierrez, an obstetrician.

Andrew is Andrea Mann and her husband's third baby.

"He was born Monday, 8 pounds, 2 ounces," Mann said.

Mann said she supports Winnie Palmer's new policy.

"I can't imagine anything putting precedence over my child's health. Whether it's work or family, or anything, if my baby's not ready to be born, I don't want to have to schedule that," Mann said.

Winnie Palmer hopes all expectant mothers will warm up to the polic.y

Orlando Health said its new policy will also reduce patient health care costs by eliminating the extra care required for early deliveries.