2,600 prisoners vaccinated after cases of Hepatitis A reported in Orange County Jail

The Department of Health vaccinated prisoners Wednesday at the Orange County Jail after four cases of hepatitis A were reported, Orange County Jail officials said.
The Department of Health vaccinated prisoners Wednesday at the Orange County Jail after four cases of hepatitis A were reported, Orange County Jail officials said.
County officials said they are dealing with hepatitis A issues.
“There have been four inmates who tested positive for the hep A virus, one of whom has been released,” a jail representative told Channel 9 reporter Shannon Butler.
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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. — TRENDING NOW

The vaccinations are being given to prevent an outbreak, jail officials said.
“All newly arrested inmates are offered the vaccination,” the representative said. “The jail and medical staff are taking necessary precautions and following all protocols, and we are taking direction from the health department.”
There are 2,600 inmates at the jail.
Hepatitis A outbreaks have been reported throughout the nation, including Ohio, North Carolina and Louisiana.

Read those stories: Ohio | North Carolina | Louisiana

Earlier this month, the FDA released a warning about certain chocolates that could have been contaminated with hepatitis A.

According to mayoclinic.org, the symptoms of hepatitis A are as follows:

- Fatigue
- Sudden nausea and vomiting
- Abdominal pain or discomfort, especially on the upper right side beneath your lower ribs (by your liver)
- Clay-colored bowel movements
- Loss of appetite
- Low-grade fever
- Dark urine
- Joint pain
- Yellowing of the skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice)
- Intense itching
Health officials said that hepatitis A signs and symptoms usually do not appear until a person has had the virus for a few weeks, but not everyone with the virus develops symptoms.
What’s the difference between Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B? (Source: mayoclinic.org)
Hepatitis A is caused by a virus that infects liver cells and causes inflammation. The inflammation can affect how your liver works and cause other signs and symptoms of hepatitis A.
The virus most commonly spreads when you eat or drink something contaminated with fecal matter, even just tiny amounts. It does not spread through sneezing or coughing.  A person can also get the virus through sexual intercourse.
Hepatitis B infection is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The virus is passed from person to person through blood, semen or other body fluids. It does not spread by sneezing or coughing.