• Osceola Co. teachers resign en masse over Common Core demands

    Updated:

    OSCEOLA COUNTY, Fla. - More than 20 teachers have resigned or decided to retire from the Osceola County School District in just the past month -- and the district already had a shortage with more than 50 vacant teaching jobs.
     
    The teachers’ union told Channel 9’s Deneige Broom that some of them quit because they're fed up with standardized testing.
     
    At Kissimmee Elementary, they need to fill two spots. At the nearby middle school, three spots are open.
     
    The union president believes many of the now vacant spots are because of testing.
     
    Apryl Jackson fights to help Osceola County teachers, but said the education association's latest fight should concern parents, too.
     
    “Ultimately, the problem that we're having now is the quality of education that our students is getting is not what it should be," said Jackson with the Osceola County Education Association.
     
    In November, about 20 teachers resigned or retired from the school district.
     
    Jackson said that's higher than they typically see and several teachers claim the way they're forced to teach now and the stress of Common Core were the deciding factors in leaving.
     
    "They're required to do more and more in their classrooms in less time," Jackson said.
     
    Those resignations include more than 50 teaching positions open throughout the district.
     
    It has left substitute teachers in classrooms, sometimes for an entire school year, and also could mean additional students are added to classes.
     
    Jackson said teachers are doing all they can.
     
    Channel 9’s Ray asked Osceola County School Board member Jay Wheeler if the district could end up suing the state's Department of Education over Common Core like other districts have.
     
    "If we sue the Department of Education, that's taxpayers suing taxpayers,” Wheeler said. “That's not a good use of resources."
     
    Wheeler hopes they can get lawmakers on their side.
     
    "The state needs to get out of the teacher evaluation business,” Wheeler said.


    Next Up: