Gingerbread monolith appears in California park

Gingerbread monolith spotted in California on Christmas

SAN FRANCISCO — A sweet, yet mysterious gingerbread monolith appeared Friday in San Francisco.

The towering 7-foot tall cookie structure, baked in homage to a metal monolith discovered last month in Utah leading to global intrigue and multiple copycats, was first discovered Friday at Corona Heights Park, KGO reported.

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The gingerbread panels were held together with icing and lined with gum drops, KRON reported.

Ananda Sharma could smell it before he saw it during his morning run.

“It made me smile. I wonder who did it, and when they put it there,” he told KQED.

In a video on social media, it appeared that one person who trekked to see it had even taken a bite.

It is unclear who made it or when it was installed. The cookie crumbled Saturday.

The first mysterious metal monolith was discovered Nov. 18 by a team of biologists counting bighorn sheep in a portion of the southeastern Utah desert. It is still unknown who installed it. Its appearance led to international interest and the creation and discovery of slightly similar copycat structures throughout the world.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

A gingerbread monolith stands on Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 2020, on a bluff in Corona Heights Park overlooking San Francisco. A nearly 7-foot-tall monolith made of gingerbread mysteriously appeared on the San Francisco hilltop on Christmas Day and collapsed the next day. The three-sided tower, held together by icing and decorated with a few gumdrops, delighted the city when word spread about its existence. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group via AP)
A gingerbread monolith stands on Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 2020, on a bluff in Corona Heights Park overlooking San Francisco. A nearly 7-foot-tall monolith made of gingerbread mysteriously appeared on the San Francisco hilltop on Christmas Day and collapsed the next day. The three-sided tower, held together by icing and decorated with a few gumdrops, delighted the city when word spread about its existence. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group via AP) (Karl Mondon/AP)