Action 9 investigates timeshare nightmare



ORLANDO, Fla. - It’s a timeshare nightmare no one expects. A Clermont woman said she found a buyer for her unit but the Lake County timeshare company refused to let her buyer see the property.
Sylvia Kelly told Action 9's Todd Ulrich she now feels trapped, not because she owns a timeshare at Summer Bay Resort, but because managers won't let her sell it.
“It was heart-wrenching. It was very sad because I wasn't expecting that," she said.
Kelly bought a week at Summer Bay in 2005. Two years ago, she had trouble making payments. Facing foreclosure in March, Sylvia said she found a friend who wanted to buy her unit at a discounted price.
"OK. The buyer says that's a good deal. I just need to see it,” said Kelly.
But that was not going to happen.
The Summer Bay agent handling Kelly's account sent her an email saying the buyer would not be allowed inside.
In the email, Kelly was told the person has to buy her property "sight unseen" and could only view online pictures. And the buyer could only use its sales agent to buy a new property, not Kelly's.
“Oh, wow. This is completely wrong,” said Kelly.
Ulrich showed the Summer Bay response to Lisa Schreier who is a timeshare consumer advocate.
“That prospective buyer has a right.  They want to see the property, see it, touch it, feel it, know it exists," she said.
Ulrich went to Summer Bay for answers.
“She claims the company would not allow a buyer on property,” said Ulrich.  
“I can't comment about that,” replied a manger.
Later, a company vice president told Ulrich the email should not have been sent and any seller has to schedule appointments to show the property but that would always be allowed.
Now, Kelly could bring a buyer if they're still interested.
“There's nothing ethical about what they're doing to me,” said Kelly.
Kelly told Action 9 the buyer changed her mind three months ago when she was refused access.
Summer Bay Resort told Action 9 it's working with Kelly to find a way out of her contract.