Hurricane Season 2017: History and science of June storms

By: Irene Sans

Updated:

June 1 is the official start to hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean.

There are many ingredients to a hurricane season. In fact, tropical development can vary depending on many factors, including sea surface temperatures; the amount of Saharan dust over the development region; upper level winds, or wind shear; and if there is an El Nino or La Nina pattern.

El Nino is a weather pattern that develops over the Pacific Ocean but has a huge influence on the Atlantic Ocean. Whenever El Nino develops, it brings increased wind shear over the Atlantic. Wind shear suppresses tropical activity by not allowing a storm to develop further. But of course, wind shear varies and if a storm develops, it might be over a region of fairly relaxed wind shear. Therefore, it would not be prevented from developing further.

READ MORE: 2017 Hurricane Forecast: NOAA predicts above-average Atlantic activity


EL NIÑO & PAST HURRICANE SEASONS

There have been mayor hurricanes even while under an El Nino pattern. In 1992, there was a strong El Nino phase and Hurricane Andrew struck South Florida as a Category 5. Maximum sustained winds in the Bahamas were recorded at 175 mph, causing over 60 fatalities and over $25 billion in damage.

Since it is not likely that El Nino will develop, wind shear will remain in the “relaxed levels,” generally speaking.

African Saharan dust outflux varies during the season and the sea surface temperatures have remained warm.

Tropical Storm Arlene developed in April over the Atlantic Ocean. The next name on the list for tropical storms is Bret.

ATLANTIC TROPICAL NAME LIST

READ MORE: UPDATES & NEW TYPES OF ADVISORIES FROM NHC

This year, Irma will debut for the name starting with the letter “I” since Irene was retired after the 2011 hurricane season. Hurricane Irene affected the Caribbean and eastern United States, causing 49 fatalities and leaving over $15 billion in damage.

 

 

In June, historically, many storms develop near or over the Gulf of Mexico.

Since 1980, there have been 31 storms with names near or over the Gulf of Mexico and just to the east of Florida.

 

 

Get ready ahead of time; it only takes one storms to make it a busy season for you

This upcoming weekend, June 2 through 4, disaster supplies will be tax-free in Florida.

Make sure to review or update your hurricane plan and your home insurance. Changes to insurance policies may take up to 30 days to go into effect.

Our team of meteorologists will closely watch the tropics and bring you prompt updates on wftv.com, the WFTV Weather App, Eyewitness News and all over our social media platforms.

This upcoming weekend, June 2 through 4, disaster supplies will be tax-free in Florida.  Make sure to review or update your hurricane plan and also your home insurance. Changes to insurance policies may take up to 30 days to come into effect.

Our team of meteorologists will closely watch the tropics and bring you prompt updates on wftv.com, WFTV Weather App, Eyewitness News and all over out social platforms. 


Video en español por nuestra meteoróloga Irene Sans

Follow our Meteorologists
Tom Terry
Brian Shields
George Waldenberger
Eboni Deon
Rusty McCranie
Irene Sans

Next Up: