• 9 facts about colon cancer

    By: Katy Camp

    Updated:

    Story Highlights

    ORLANDO, Fla. - March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Experts want you to commit to healthy habits and regular screenings to help fight colon cancer. Here are 9 facts about the disease.

    1. Colorectal cancer is the cancer of the colon or the rectum. Most colorectal cancers first develop as polyps, which are abnormal growths inside the colon or rectum. They can become cancerous if they aren't removed.

    2. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. The Colorectal Cancer Alliance says one in 23 adults will get it in the course of their lifetime. While most cases are attributed to people 50 years or older, cases in younger people are on the rise.

     

     

    3. The American Cancer Society says men and women should start regular screenings for colorectal cancers at age 45. 

    This undated microscope image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows human colon cancer cells with the cell nuclei stained red. According to new American Cancer Society guidelines released on Wednesday, May 30, 2018, most U.S. adults should begin getting screened for colon cancer when they turn 45. (NCI Center for Cancer Research/NIH via AP)
    This undated microscope image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows human colon cancer cells with the cell nuclei stained red. According to new American Cancer Society guidelines released on Wednesday, May 30, 2018, most U.S. adults should begin getting screened for colon cancer when they turn 45. (NCI Center for Cancer Research/NIH via AP)
    Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    4. There are several types of screenings for colorectal cancer, but they are broken down into two groups: stool-based tests and visual exams of the colon-rectum.

    5. People are at increased risk for colorectal cancers if they have a family history of the disease, have had it before, have had radiation to their abdominal or pelvic area.

    6. The colon is also referred to as the large intestine. It removes water, salt and some nutrients to produce stool.The colon is five feet long and weighs 4 pounds on average.

     

     

    7. The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons says 140,000 new cases of colorectal cancer will be diagnosed this year. 56,000 people will die from the disease this year.

    What are the warning signs for colorectal cancer? Here is a list from the Colorectal Cancer Alliance.

    8. A colectomy is the removal of some, or all of the colon. A human being can live without a colon, but the body needs another route to rid itself of waste.

     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    As you may or may not know, March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. If you’re a follower of mine you should know, as of November 7th, I am a survivor of Stage 3C Colon Cancer. Because of cancer, I had to get a Colostomy bag. The reason for a colostomy bag is for when your colon (large intestine or bowel) is damaged and not working. The reason i got mine was because my colon was basically just a big cancer tumor. They had to remove it or I wouldn’t have been able to beat the cancer. They left a little bit of my colon so they can reconnect me if my body allows... thats for a later date. At first I was so so so insecure about it and that still hits me from time to time BUT I need to always remember that if it wasn’t for this I would be dead today. It’s distracted me from drag because I don’t know how to dress anymore with this... bums me out a lot, but maybe one day soon I’ll find a designer to help me out. It’s definitely made me more insecure when it comes to dating as well. Like who wants to date someone with a bag of shit hanging off their stomach hahaha!! I know one day someone won’t care, and most likely they don’t anyway now BUT my lack of confidence with it definitely hinders my dating life. As much as it bums me out from time to time I need to remember it SAVED my life. It allows me to walk outside, it allows me to enjoy concerts, it allowed me to go on road trips again, it allows me to eat again, IT LETS ME LIVE. So all in all cancer changes your body and your mind. The biggest thing I noticed was how it fucked me up emotionally more than my body issues but I got colon cancer... colon cancer didn’t get me. 💙

    A post shared by Rellika/Daniel Lucas Oxford (@rellllika) on

     

    9. The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation details two common options for creating an alternate path once a colectomy is performed. The first, an ileastomy, a surgically created hole in the abdominal wall that allows stool to pass. The second, an ileoanal pouch anal anastomosis, creates an internal pouch connected to the anus which allows stool to pass naturally. 

    Join WFTV Anchor Jorge Estevez on Thursday, March 21, for a special Facebook Live event with medical experts from AdventHealth OrlandoLike us on Facebook to ask the doctors your questions

     

     

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