• 'I thought he was going to kill me,' says woman who slipped note to vet staff asking for help

    By: Jason Kelly , Karen Parks

    Updated:

    DELAND, Fla. - A woman who escaped her boyfriend, who's accused of holding her at gunpoint, spoke to Channel 9 Wednesday.

    Police said Jeremy Floyd held his girlfriend captive and now faces more charges because he tried to contact her from jail 47 times in three days.

    "I was terrified. I thought he was going to kill me," said the woman, who asked to not be identified. "It just became too much, because I would wake up and I would have 10 missed phone calls."

    She said she answered her boyfriend's calls, but she told him several times to stop calling her.

    Read: Deputies: DeLand woman passes note saying boyfriend holding her captive

    Deputies said they arrested Floyd Friday after his girlfriend slipped a note to staff members at a DeLand animal hospital asking for help.

    Floyd's charges were upgraded to stalking, and the victim changed her number, but she said he called her sister's phone at least three times Wednesday.

    The badly bruised victim said Floyd beat her days earlier during an alcohol- and drug-fueled argument and held her hostage. She said she had to think quickly to save her life, because Floyd was armed with a gun.

    "I slipped a pen off the vet's desk," she said. "I went to the women's restroom, and I wrote a note. I had it on my hand. I was still wearing my sunglasses, and I passed the note to the vet."

    The note asked for a call to police for help.

    "I was shaking really bad (because), I knew the cops were going to come," she said. "But I took off my sunglasses so she could see my bruised eye, and we kind of had a secret head nod type thing like I understand."

    Floyd was arrested and ordered to not contact the victim, but investigators said that didn't stop him.

    "I would wake up, and I would have 10 missed phone calls," the victim said.

    Floyd was charged with violating pretrial release conditions, but investigators amended that charge to stalking.

    WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer said there is nothing in place to stop inmates from contacting victims they've been ordered to not contact, but legislators hope to change that during the next legislative session.

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