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Dry air keeping tropical waves off the coast of Africa disorganized

ORLANDO, Fla. — Update:

A rapid upswing in normal tropical activity typically begins in August.

Dry and dusty air from Africa has been helping keep several tropical waves from showing organization.

This will keep the tropics quiet into early next week.

Read: Hurricane season: What is the Saffir-Simpson scale; how does it work; is there a Category 6?

There are two tropical waves that have recently moved from the western coast of Africa.

But neither system has developed yet, and it’s too soon to know if either one would threaten the U.S. should they develop.

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As we approach the peak of the 2023 Atlantic Hurricane Season, the tropics are relatively calm but still active.

Channel 9 meteorologists are tracking two strong tropical waves that have recently moved from the western coast of Africa.

Both storm systems are moving east across the Atlantic and could develop next week.

Read: Hurricane season: What is the Saffir-Simpson scale; how does it work; is there a Category 6?

It’s too soon to tell if either storm system will threaten the U.S.

Climate conditions over the central Atlantic are not looking good for development, despite the warm waters.

Read: Seminole County prepares for hurricane response and rescue operations

As of Friday morning, both systems are only being monitored by storm trackers.

Channel 9 will continue to keep an eye on the tropics and provide updates on Eyewitness News.

Follow our Severe Weather team on Twitter for live updates:

Jason Kelly

Jason Kelly, WFTV.com

Jason Kelly joined WFTV Channel 9 in 2014. He serves as the station's Digital Executive Producer.