Turnberry Reserve whistleblower reflects on year of turmoil, changes

Video: Turnberry Reserve whistleblower reflects on year of turmoil, changes

KISSIMMEE, Fla. — A year after she first spoke out to 9 Investigates about what was described as an abusive homeowners association management company and security guard, the woman who blew the whistle inside Turnberry Reserve is telling investigative reporter Karla Ray about the bank records that led to the most recent arrest of the community’s former property manager last week.

Homeowner Maria Napolitano called Channel 9 in September 2019 with concerns regarding the ex-cop-turned-felon, Joseph Conover, who was working security inside the neighborhood, as well as his longtime girlfriend, property manager Sherry Raposo, who gave him the job.

Former Turnberry Reserve property manager arrested on fraud-related charges

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Both Raposo and Conover have since been arrested for running an unlicensed security company, and removed from their roles in the community.

State investigators also determined Raposo tried to rig an HOA election last year, which led to the entire board of directors being replaced.

Now, Napolitano is the board vice president, with access to the financial records that led to Raposo facing fraud charges.

Osceola County Financial Crimes investigators determined that Raposo used HOA funds to bail Conover out of jail in North Carolina after he was arrested there on charges related to his time as a company police officer in that state.

For the month that she’s officially held the title of vice president of Turnberry’s HOA, Napolitano has had her work cut out for her, trying to make sense of homeowner accounts and financial records once managed by Raposo.

“Just from what we’ve been able to see, there’s a lot of questionable transactions that should be coming to light,” Napolitano said.

Napolitano initiated the call for an investigation into Management 35 Firm owner Raposo. Last week, the embattled property manager was arrested on fraud charges related to an alleged use of $25,000 to pay for Conover’s bail.

After his conviction on obstruction and battery charges, Conover was put in charge of security inside Turnberry Reserve until 9 Investigates exposed him a year ago.  In their roles, Raposo and Conover had the power to levy fines against homeowners for HOA violations.

“We were taken advantage of. We were bulled. It was a horrible situation to be in - to have him patrolling our community every day,” Napolitano said.

Napolitano and the rest of the newly designated HOA board are now scrutinizing every fine and late fee given to homeowners under the rule of Management 35.

“We lived in fear of losing our homes. They did it to me. They’ve done it to all my neighbors. The fear of coming home and not knowing what’s going to be waiting in your mailbox,” Napolitano said.

When reached by text message, Raposo’s attorney declined to provide a response or statement on her latest charges.