• Jennifer Kesse: Police seek tips 12 years after Orlando woman disappeared

    By: Jason Kelly , Shannon Butler

    Updated:

    ORLANDO, Fla. - Orlando police Chief John Mina held a news conference Wednesday, 12 years after a 24-year-old woman vanished.

    Police said Jennifer Kesse disappeared between 10 p.m. on Jan. 23, 2006, and 8 a.m. on Jan. 24, 2006.

    Investigators said her car was later discovered at the Huntington on the Green Condominiums, about 1 mile from her home.

    Photos: Missing woman Jennifer Kesse

    Mina said Wednesday that the agency has assigned a detective to review Kesse's case from the beginning of the investigation on an almost full-time basis. He said the agency has also printed a surveillance image of a person of interest on a city bus in hopes of generating new leads.

    Logan Kesse, Jennifer Kesse's brother, told Channel 9 that Wednesday’s news conference was a dog-and-pony show and an insult to his family.

    "It's been 12 years,” he said. “Did they do this last year? No. The year before? No.”

    Photos: High-profile Central Florida missing persons cases

    Jennifer Kesse’s relatives said that although they’re grateful for the Orlando Police Department's help in their search for her, they plan to sue the agency because they’re frustrated with what they said were mistakes made in the case.

    For years, Jennifer Kesse’s family has wanted her disappearance to be deemed a cold case so their private investigator could review the case with fresh eyes.

    "It's not our practice to turn over files or case notes of information to anyone in the public, and we believe that could possibly jeopardize this investigation as well as set a precedent in future investigation," Mina said.

    Her family wants Mina to grant them access to tips that were received in the weeks following her disappearance.

    Photos: Crews search for Jennifer Kesse

    "This is a joke. This is comical. And I hope everyone can realize that," Logan Kesse said. "This is only being done because we have attorneys involved, because we are on their (expletive) and they (expletive) up."

    Mina said state law protects the agency from releasing certain public records. He said handing over an investigation would set a bad precedent.

    "We never stop searching for missing persons," Orlando police spokeswoman Michelle Guido said in an emailed statement. "On this anniversary, we are enhancing our focus and asking anyone with information to come forward and help us solve this case."

    Jennifer Kesse's family members said their vehicle was burglarized during the news conference.

    OPD said in a statement, "Former attorneys for the Kesse family indicated the family's intention to file a lawsuit, but neither OPD nor the city of Orlando has ever been served with a lawsuit in relation to this matter.

    "If we were to release any active criminal investigative material to the Kesse family, it would become public record - and it would be available to anyone, including potential suspects. If that happened, it could jeopardize the investigation. That's not something we want in this case or in any other active criminal investigation." 

    Watch: OPD and Jennifer Kesse news conference on disappearance


    Hear from Kesse's brother below:


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