Study finds pregnant people at increased risk for catching COVID-19, advice on vaccination still mixed

Video: Study finds pregnant people at increased risk for catching COVID-19, advice on vaccination still mixed

ORLANDO, Fla. — A new study found a person’s risk of catching the coronavirus shoots up by 70% while they’re pregnant.

On top of that, pregnant women still don’t have a clear answer if they should be vaccinated or not.

READ: COVID-19 pandemic leads to drop in life expectancy in the U.S.

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Some of the best scientists and doctors in the country are split on what expectant mothers should do.

Pfizer announced a vaccine trial to find out, and the company wants to look at 4,000 pregnant women all over the world. And while the trial will take two years to finish, scientists are hoping to gather some useful data within the first three to four months.

“Well we’re hoping it’s going to show a significant immunologic response in the mom as well as in the infant. So, so that both individuals will benefit,” said Dr. Robert Jeanfreau, with MedPharmics.

Dr. Anthony Fauci recently said that about 20,000 pregnant women have already been vaccinated with “no red flags.”  And the CDC said for those expecting, the vaccine is a “personal choice.”

But the World Health Organization said due to a lack of information, it “does not recommend the vaccination of pregnant women at this time.”

Dr. Neil Finkler from AdventHealth said the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is backing vaccination.

“ACOG recommendation are that pregnant women get the vaccine, and those think of getting pregnant get the vaccine, there is no evidence today that decreased fertility either in the short run or as long as been out and tested,” he said.