Michigan day care license revoked after child puts other child in clothes dryer, turns it on

GARDEN CITY, Mich. — A Garden City, Michigan, day care center’s license has been revoked after an investigation revealed that a child placed another child in a clothes dryer and turned it on.

>> Read more trending news

The day care operator, who has not been identified publicly, never told the parents of the child placed in the appliance about the incident and lied about informing the parents during the investigation process, the Detroit Free Press reported, citing the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs report.

According to WJBK, violations levied against the woman include, but are not limited to:

  • Lack of appropriate care and supervision.
  • Household member’s suitability and conduciveness to the welfare of children.
  • Failure to provide truthful and accurate information to the department during an investigation.

The in-home day care’s license was revoked Nov. 3 after the incident occurred this past summer, involving a child for whom the unidentified woman was caring, the TV station reported.

The woman is no longer allowed to operate a day care and must inform all parents of children in her care about her license revocation, the Free Press reported.

According to a news release, the woman brought a child, described only as a Minor Household Member 1, or MHM 1, to the hospital on Aug. 4 and told a nurse that she was “stressed out” because MHM 1 had put another child in the clothes dryer and turned it on. MHM 1 later admitted to a nurse and social worker that she did put another child in the dryer and turned it on.

Meanwhile, the child who had been placed in the dryer later told her mother about the incident, describing the experience as “hot” and “dark,” noting it “hurt my back,” the Free Press reported.

Authorities also determined that the minor child who placed the other child in the dryer had been treated for mental health issues in an in-patient setting in January of this year, WJBK reported, noting that the day care operator had been legally bound to inform regulators of the hospitalization within three business days and did not.