Ohio dad overcomes bus shortage, transports kids to school in limo

COLUMBUS, Ohio — This sure beats a bus ride to school.

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An Ohio man, fed up with his children missing school due to a statewide bus shortage, took matters into his own hands, using his family’s limousine to help get children to school in Columbus.

“Everybody is so shocked, like, ‘Who is this guy pulling up in a limo?’ and then they wonder, ‘Who is in the back seat’,” Sean Rogers Jr. told WSYX. “Everybody always wants to say, ‘Let’s help the community, let’s stop this violence,’ that type of stuff.

“But I feel like a big step of stopping the violence is getting kids to school instead of letting them skip school and go out and get into trouble.”

Rogers posted an offer on Facebook to transport area students to school. Dozens of parents reached out, including many in his neighborhood, the television station reported.

Rogers took 25 children to school on Monday and helped 42 children on Tuesday.

“A little girl almost made me cry yesterday because she cried because she missed, I think they said she missed almost a week of school just due to transportation,” Rogers told WSYX. “She cried because she was so happy to go to school.”

“He’s a blessing, he is a blessing that’s helpful. It helps a lot of kids out,” Quetta Jaye told WSYX. “The buses don’t come in the morning, they don’t come at night, they don’t have a driver for our kids to make it to school and back.”

Rogers said his children go to Graham Elementary and Middle School.

Officials at the school did not respond to WSYX’s request for comment.

A Columbus City Schools spokesperson told the television station that a limousine is not an Ohio Department of Education-approved vehicle for school transportation.

In a board meeting on Tuesday night, Columbus City Schools Superintendent Talisa Dixon said that 15% to 20% of the district’s drivers called off from work almost every day last week, WSYX reported.

“Our team is also advocating at the state level for measures that would enable us to provide improved transportation services,” Dixon told board members. “This includes the use of vans and additional certification opportunities for trainees.”