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Coronavirus: Global COVID-19 cases surpass 50M as total US infections near 10M

The number of global COVID-19 cases soared past 50 million on Sunday, as the United States' total cases inched closer to the 10 million milestone.

According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, global cases reached 50,325,072 by 9:25 p.m. Sunday and have resulted in nearly 1.3 million deaths. Meanwhile, U.S. cases totaled 9,961,324 and have resulted in nearly 238,000 deaths.

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Saturday marked the third consecutive day that new coronavirus cases diagnosed in the United States surpassed 120,000, with Johns Hopkins University confirming a total of 126,742 new cases that day.

The seven-day moving average of new cases nationwide is now more than 110,000, or more than double what it was one month ago, NPR reported.

The United States, with about 4.3% of the world population, now accounts for about 20% of global COVID-19 cases, USA Today reported.

Meanwhile, India follows most closely behind the United States, with 8,507,754 COVID-19 cases, while Brazil’s 5,664,115 cases mean those three countries account for nearly half of all global cases.

Six other countries have reported at least one million cases each, including:

France: 1,835,187 cases, resulting in 40,490 deaths.

Russia: 1,760,420 cases, resulting in 30,292 deaths.

Spain: 1,328,832 cases, resulting in 38,833 deaths.

Argentina: 1,242,182 cases, resulting in 33,560 deaths.

United Kingdom: 1,193,350 cases, resulting in 49,134 deaths.

Colombia: 1,143,887 cases, resulting in 32,791 deaths.

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