• More than 50 people rescued from flood waters in Altamonte Springs neighborhood

    By: Michael Lopardi , Jeff Deal

    Updated:

    ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. - A Seminole County neighborhood is waiting on several feet of water to recede after Hurricane Irma tore through Central Florida.

    Firefighters rescued dozens of people in an Altamonte Springs neighborhood where a massive amount of water from the Little Wekiva River spilled over the banks.  

    Some residents in the area were seen wading through knee-deep water.

    For some living on Little Wekiva Road, it was the only way to get around.

    Photos: Seminole County damage after Irma

    Resident William Panacek said it’s some of the worst flooding he’s ever seen.

    “Yesterday, when I was in there, I think we have about eight or nine inches of water,” said Panacek. “That's what we had seen, and everything below that line is soaked.”

    The Little Wekiva River swelled under Irma's heavy rains, causing water to rise up to six inches an hour.

    Firefighters rescued more than 50 people and a dozen pets in the area.

    Video: Some Seminole County flood victims blame road work for flooding issues

    Altamonte Springs police, Seminole County deputies and Fire Rescue crews loaded up in two and a half ton trucks to make it through the high waters.

    “I'm sad. I can't even think of the words say,” said Panacek.

    The Little Wekiva River swelled under Irma's heavy rains, causing water to rise up to six inches an hour.

    Firefighters rescued more than 50 people and a dozen pets in the area.

    “I'm sad. I can't even think of the words say,” said Panacek.

    Read: I-4 crumbling at SR 434 after Hurricane Irma

    He returned Tuesday to check on the water level.

    Watch: Flooding on Little Wekiva Road

    Residents in the neighborhood have no power, some are running out of water and food, but the city manager said for some reason, some opted to stay.

    “There are a lot of people who have said, ‘I’m not leaving.’ A lot of people want to stay in their house,” said city manager Frank Martz. 

    Monica Urias was one of more than 50 people evacuated Monday.

    She’s worried about her roommate who stayed behind.

    “It’s dangerous to stay in there. She’s going to need water,” Urias said.

    Crews are using boats to bring residents food and supplies to those who won’t leave.

    Gianna Rosado and her mother, Sarah Rosado, stayed initially because they didn’t think they could make it out with their dogs.

    By Tuesday, they didn’t have a choice.

    “They said we had 30 minutes to evacuate so it was kind of overwhelming to pack whatever we could,” Rosado.

    Panacek had evacuated for the storm, only to find his home of 30 years had flooded.

    “When we started going out, we saw that the water was still coming into the house instead of going down,” he said.

    He was able to salvage important belongings before the hurricane, but most other items have been damaged.

    “Horrible. Lost all of my stuff,” said Panacek.

    He said the area had flooded before, but he decided to keep living in the home because his wife didn't want to move.

    Now, he may have no choice.

    Neighbors believe it could take several days for the water to recede.

    Other parts of Seminole County experiences flooding as well, including Cranes Roost and Black Hammock

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